Tag Archives: tendonitis

PRP. It’s a real pain in the butt

Seventeen years now. It’s been roughly 17 years that I’ve struggled with intermittent hip pain / hamstring tightness / sciatica, blah-ba-de-blah, etc. It comes and goes, and while it has never stopped me from running, it has stopped me from running well. My latest flare-up, which began about six months ago, has been the worst – and most stubborn – yet.

THE VERDICT

Having completely run out of patience babying my achy butt, moderating my speed and gingerly prancing up hills to avoid overstretching my immobile hamstring, I finally saw an orthopedist and pushed for an MRI. Verdict: chronic partial tearing, scarring and tissue thickening along the hamstring, most severe at its origin near the ischial tuberosity; essentially high-hamstring tendinopathy. It’s anyone’s guess when the degeneration began, but the tendon clearly isn’t healing itself. After an unwelcome lecture pointing out that my aging body is only going to further weaken (I’m 32 for god’s sake!), that my vegetarian diet is not suited for athletes (curious how he’d explain these ultra-runner and ultra-athlete veggie legends), that my bare feet need “support” and that I should really just stop running so much, my doctor finally offered a rational alternative: PRP, or Platelet Rich Plasma. I eagerly agreed, desperate to try anything that might nip this butt-pain in the bud and finally restore strength and functionality to my weakened tendon.

THE PROCEDURE

As a relatively new technique, PRP protocols vary considerably across practices. My doctor advised a series of three injections, spaced 7-10 days apart, although he reported the number of necessary treatments can range anywhere from one to five, depending on the injury and patient. And in some cases, the treatment isn’t effective at all. The procedure is actually quite simple and takes under an hour. They first draw blood which is then centrifuged and processed for several minutes to yield a solution rich in platelets. This provides a concentrated source of factors that support healing, like growth factors and cytokines. The goal is to induce an inflammatory response to promote tissue repair. Next, the doctor identifies the target site by manually probing around until he hits the “hot spot” of pain. After preparing the skin with some disinfectant (and a mysterious cooling liquid), he inserts the needle, guided by ultrasound, and injects the platelet-rich plasma. In my case, the pain was relatively diffuse, so he injected at several different locations of my hamstring origin, to cover all bases.

Platelet_Rich_Plasma_PRP-Therapy-IMAGE

I will not lie, the procedure isn’t fun. There were some painful moments, although never intolerable. I’ve read that many physicians will use local anesthetics during the procedure and prescribe pain-killers for pain management, although mine did neither. I guess I just look that tough. 😉

As a relatively novel, borderline experimental treatment, PRP isn’t covered by all insurance plans. Mine fortunately covered it fully. Otherwise, each injection may put you back $1000 or more.

THE AFTERMATH

The doctor indicated that I’d be fine to drive afterwards, which was far from true. For the next couple of days, sitting – especially on hard surfaces or while driving – was extremely uncomfortable. There was a constant deep, dull ache and the sensation of a severe bruise at the injection site. Since the therapy relies on a strong inflammatory response, ice and anti-inflammatory medications (which I avoid anyway) are not allowed. Each day the pain subsides slightly, and today, four days post-injection, I feel 90% normal (not healed, just 90% of my pre-PRP state).

ACTIVITY

My doctor gave very limited guidelines for my activity levels during the recovery period. He in fact skirted the issue, indicating that my activity depended on my “need” to run, and my healing goals. On one hand, he said, he’s had athletes compete hard just a few days after the treatment and manage a full, successful recovery. On the other hand, any amount of irritation to the tissue could delay healing and set me back. A confusing, unsatisfactory response. Being both a strong believer in active recovery, and one who spirals rapidly downwards when I can’t run, I opted for the more aggressive recovery trajectory.

After two days of near total rest (excepting some very light yoga), I ventured out on a test run. I set a mental limit of three miles, acknowledging that attempting a run so soon was pushing the envelope already. So of course, I accidentally ran six instead. To my great surprise, my hamstring felt no worse than pre-PRP. Sure, it was tight. Yes, it was achy. But the discomfort level was the same as while resting or walking, and did not progress throughout the run. Today – the day after this test run – the hamstring continues to improve. So I’m treating myself to another easy run, of no more than 4 miles. I promise.

MY BOTTOM’S BOTTOM LINE

So what’s the verdict on PRP? It’s far too early to tell. For one, it’s admittedly painful. And at only four days into the therapy, it’s far too early to tell whether it’s working. Purportedly, symptoms may start to improve anywhere between several days to months after treatment. But the underlying science is logical, and the immediate resulting deep ache confirms that an inflammatory response is indeed underway. This is enough to give me hope, and hope is enough to keep fueling my runs.

Have you gotten PRP or are you considering it? I’d love to hear your experiences and questions!

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PriTSD: Post-running-injury Traumatic Stress Disorder

For a while now, I’ve been intending to write on every runner’s favorite topic – injuries. I’m certainly no sports medicine specialist, but let’s face it – my share of close encounters over the past several years makes me almost as qualified. Having stayed remarkably healthy over the recent months, my original vision for this post was to highlight my invaluable (ehem) insights into injury prevention. Had I written that post and adhered to my own advice, maybe I would not presently be discussing post-injury recovery and running withdrawal.

December 26, 2011. House-bound by the bitter cold and snow but needing to release some pent-up holiday energy, I resorted to a treadmill run and treated myself to running the final 4 miles barefoot. A subtle ache appeared on the top of my left foot which, given my surging endorphins, I of course ignored. Over the ensuing two months, this foot issue re-emerged several times without progressing beyond mild discomfort. Assuming myself invincible, I continued to push my limits, simultaneously training for my next marathon and increasing my mileage in minimalist footwear.

Lateral ankle

February 18, 2012. While on my weekly long run, the foot ache re-appeared, but this time worsened from mild annoyance to a cautionary, progressive ache. Of course, I convinced myself it was nothing and completed the 22 miles. The extent of the damage was only evident while attempting to run two days later, each step coupled with a shooting pain along the top of my left foot and ankle. I had run myself into a full-blow case of extensor digitorum longus tendonitis.

Today. Three weeks later and still unable to run. It may appear ludicrous that runners voluntarily run themselves into such debilitating conditions. Yet I’m convinced the very qualities that make us so vulnerable to overuse injuries are also what make us so well-suited for distance running. We persevere, adhere religiously to our goals and tend to have remarkably high pain tolerances. Running is a phenomenal way to heighten bodily, mental and environmental awareness; however, when those sensations are overwhelmingly positive and rewarding it can be exceedingly difficult to detect subtle messages of injury or imbalance. It is therefore crucial to heed those quiet warnings which we too often acknowledge only in retrospect.

These past three weeks have been a genuine physical and emotional rollercoaster. At the risk of sounding melodramatic, for a runner the post-injury period can remarkably parallel the aftermath of other major traumatic experiences. The process begins with denial, during which you stubbornly insist the condition is minor, fleeting and can be run through. This is followed by acceptance of the injury’s severity but also shock and irrational fears that you will never run again. This can also coincide with veritable physical withdrawal, making this the most difficult stage. For me, going from running 60-70 miles/week to zero sends me into a physical and mental downward spiral. The crash is characterized by a paradoxical combination of lethargy and anxious restlessness. During my first post-injury week I essentially shut down, my motivation and productivity in lab and school plummeting.

Eventually, healthier coping mechanisms take hold, allowing you to start taking proactive steps towards recovery. In week two I replaced the couch with cross-training, forcing myself to go to the dreaded … gym. With no apparent improvement from the standard RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate) approach, during week three I began to seek alternative methods to expedite the healing process. I’ve begun acupuncture, homeopathy (ruta graveolens) and K-laser therapy and have since noticed marked improvement – namely increased range of motion, reduced inflammation and the ability to walk pain-free! I can only speculate whether this change is attributable to any one of these treatments, a placebo effect or simply reflects the natural time-course of my body’s recovery process. Regardless of their source, such improvements are a comforting reminder of the body’s innate healing powers and the critical importance of a positive and proactive approach towards recovery.

I won’t lie. Three weeks and counting of no running is driving me crazy. But I suspect these periods may be invaluable for an endurance athlete’s long-term growth, complementing our physical stamina with invaluable training in psychological endurance. Stay tuned for progress reports … I foresee a strong tendon and lots of running in the near future!

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