Tag Archives: biomechanics

Barefoot Running Workshop 2: Lower and Upper Biomechanics

In the first of our Barefoot Running Workshops, we explored facts and fiction of barefoot running, sensory awareness and mechanics of the foot. In our second workshop today, we introduced basic running kinematics before moving north from the foot to cover mechanics of the lower and upper body. Here’s a recap of the workshop highlights for those who missed it.

RUNNING KINEMATICS

Before diving into the nitty-gritty of leg, hip and torso function, it’s essential to understand how one gets from zero to running in the first place. Running has been described in a multitude of ways, from a controlled fall to alternating one-legged hops to a springy, aerial variant of walking. Given this confusing jumble of terminology, what then are the essential movements that convert a stationary body to a running body? The basic motion is far simpler than most runners would imagine. There’s no jumping, bouncing or flying required! In essence, running is nothing more than marching while moving forward.

March. Simply pick up the feet, the ankle gliding parallel to the shin up to the knee. Return the foot to its starting position and repeat with the other leg. That’s it. The 100-ups are a great exercise to reinforce this motor pattern.

Lean. Once you’ve mastered marching in place, it’s time to transform this into forward motion. This too is simpler than it sounds. To move forward, the body must lean forward. This lean should NOT come from bending at the waist; “sitting” or folding forward will cause a host of problems from the back to the hips to the knees. Instead, the lean should originate at the ankles, the entire body leaning angled together along the same plane. By simply adopting a slight lean from the ankles, you will fall forward and be propelled from stationary marching into forward travel. March, lean, and BAM … you’re magically running!

BIOMECHANICS II: LOWER BODY 

Lift the legs. A constant upward motion should be maintained throughout the gait cycle. This is especially important after striking, when the legs should immediately lift up. The feet should land directly under the hips, neither reaching forward nor crossing over the midline. Both overstriding and a cross-over gait can lead to various injuries. The Gait Guys offer an excellent series of videos on correcting a cross-over gait (part 1, 2 and 3).

Bend the knees. To facilitate a smooth ride, bend and relax the knees. The knees can serve as shock absorbers when allowed to flex, so the greater the bend, the less impact will be sustained upon landing. This is especially helpful when running downhill.

Stable hips. The shin bone’s connected to the thigh bone … the thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone … Yes, it’s all connected, and these chains are particularly notable in the context of how the legs move in response to the hips. The hips are indeed the powerhouse and main driver of a strong running stride. Strong, stable hips are essential, and muscular imbalances or poor hip mechanics are the source of many leg and foot injuries. Don’t let the hips sink or drop, but keep them level on the horizontal plane. The hips serve as the body’s steering wheel, so be sure to keep them facing forward and aligned with the shoulders.

BIOMECHANICS III: UPPER BODY

Core rotation. Some rotation is key to balancing the body’s left-right movements, but excessive rotation, or from the wrong place, can be problematic. Most of the rotation should originate in the core. Imagine the pelvis as a chandelier, the torso as its suspension cable and your head as the ceiling. The pelvis should dangle, relaxed, and rotate freely from the waist, supported by the strength of the strong, elongated core. As the right legs swings back, the right pelvis rotates back. It’s not forced or pulled, but swings naturally, allowing greater leg extension without over-stressing the hips. (The chandelier example was adapted from this excellent article.)

Shoulders and arms. Keep the shoulders low and relaxed, but don’t slouch. Some shoulder motion is fine, but be careful not to dip them or overly rotate the chest. After the hips, the shoulders serve as a second steering wheel, so they should remain stable and facing forward. Keep the arms close to your sides, elbows at a 90 degree angle and swinging forward and backward rather than across the chest. The rhythm of your arms directly affects hip and leg motion; a rapid arm punp can encourage faster leg turnover, and fluid forward-backward swinging will minimize inefficient lateral movements.

Head and posture. Your head leads and guides its body below. Keep your head up and neck stretched tall and long. Unlike owls, humans are blessed with eyes that move independently from the head, so you can still look at the ground without titling the head down. The entire body – from the ankles up to the tip of the head – should form a strong, continuous line, without kinks from poor posture or bending at the waist. Imagine being lifted upwards, suspended by a bird or plane (or pick your favorite flying power-creature) directly above your head.

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

Now it’s time to integrate these elements into your perfect running form! This video from the Natural Running Center is a beautiful example of a strong, efficient stride. Revisit this video and try to mimic Mark’s fluid, light motion whenever you need a refresher.

The final key to optimizing your stride is forgetting everything you just read and just run. Yes, I am (mostly) serious. Sometimes less can be more in terms of tapping into your optimal gait. Running is one of the most natural movements for humans, and a strong, healthy body will readily fall into it’s own unique running stride. Obsessing about every component of your form will not only take the joy out of running, but can also backfire, inducing unnecessary tension or forced, inefficient motor patterns. If you find this occurring while tweaking your running mechanics, abandon the effort and simply allow your body move fluidly and aimlessly. You might find that your muscles were one step ahead of your mind, and knew the route to efficient running all along.

Join us for the final session of our Barefoot Running Workshop series Sunday, July 12 at 3 pm. As usual, we’ll meet at the Founder’s Statue at the northwest corner of Balboa and El Prado in Balboa Park. In this final session, we’ll wrap up with how best to run hills and do speed work, as well as safety and practical considerations of running barefoot. More details and RSVP here.

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The structure-function paradox: Thoughts from a barefoot-curious reader

One perk I’ve enjoyed since starting this blog has been connecting with like-minded readers … runners, barefooters and scientists. Occasionally readers will reach out with their personal stories or questions (which I love!) The other day I received an email from a reader curious about the importance of toe and metatarsal alignment for foot health. His insights into foot biomechanics, enthusiasm for optimizing his own barefoot experience, and curiosity for the best path to do so – were striking. As he raised some interesting questions that are relevant for anyone considering transitioning to a barefoot lifestyle, I’m sharing his message, along with my response, below (note that I’ve removed his name for privacy and have trimmed the email for brevity).

I’d like to say thank you so much for documenting your experience, it is an invaluable source of information. I have great investment in this movement for myself (patellar tendonitis, fallen arches), and my family (bunion sufferers). I’m going to cut right to the chase. You seem very knowledgeable about the biomechanics of the foot, and I feel there is a significant sliver in the venn— diagram between our two philosophies. What about our toes alignment with our metatarsal shafts?

This is an idea that I see very rarely addressed among barefoot runners. I’m not sure how much of this information you’re familiar with, probably all of it but just in case I’m going to breeze through it. The shod VS the unshod life, a developed condition. I feel like this is so often ignored. In my rehabilitation from conventional footwear, I’ve been made aware of the deformation that has taken place in my bones and tendons that has bent my big toe inward, bent my small toes outward, and given me hammertoe. Why do I see so few barefoot runners addressing this? I work everyday to stretch and re-align my great toe into its natural place, a continuation of the metatarsal shaft, so that it can once again be in its place of maximum support.

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I even invested in a product that re-alignes my toes back to the way they were, so as to, over time, affect the bone and tendon structure, pushing them back into alignment. But seeing your story, how you came through without the use of these, and how your toe alignment between 2011 and 2012 didn’t seem to change much. In your recent pictures it’s hard to discern the alignment of your toes, have you seen a difference since 2012?

Does this idea hold water to you at all or do you consider something else entirely more important than alignment. I would love to know, I’ve been trying to make sense of going completely barefoot, but with my great toe alignment (about the same as yours in 2012) it just doesn’t make sense to me, I feel like I’d be putting weight on a delicate system that no longer is in the proper alignment to do its job properly. Am I completely off the mark? Any thoughts would be extremely appreciated.

I love this last picture, and it is the most profound and affirming to me, a (mostly) un-contacted tribe within the amazon. Their toes are my every day goal. I know little biomechanics, but this has philosophy has resonated with me. Am I wasting my time with this? Is this new information to you? What made you feel your path was best?

AmazonTribe

MY RESPONSE:

Thanks for your email. I love hearing from others with a shared interest in natural, barefoot living. Indeed, I’m aware of the deformations shoes make on our feet, and that toe separators can help reverse this (I actually have some myself).

I think the answer to most of your questions lies in your goal. If your main aim is simply to realign your bone structure, then sure, work on this just the way you are. For me, better toe/metatarsal alignment has been an incidental consequence of pursuing my other goals – overall healthier, stronger feet that allow me to move the way my body is meant to. So there are two, albeit related, issues here: structure and function. You seem very focused on changing your foot structure, but for what purpose? If it’s so that your foot (and body) will also move better, the best way to achieve that is simply to use your feet the way they’re meant to be used. By going barefoot as much as possible you will quickly build muscle, tendon and bone strength and as a consequence, your foot shape will also change.

I gave up shoes four years ago and have indeed noticed major changes since then. The toe splay hasn’t been dramatic, but my arches have become strong and high and my feet and ankles have gone from soft and dainty looking, to thick, toned and defined. This sounds odd, but my feet have become my favorite physical asset – I’m proud of their transformation into powerful, beautiful structures. At this point, I could care less how my toes splay, since my feet are functioning magnificently, allowing me to walk and run for miles on end, pain-free and carefree!

You’re concerned that you could injure yourself by going barefoot if your bone alignment isn’t perfect. This is a slight possibility, but easily avoided by simply listening to your body. I would be concerned less about proper alignment than general foot weakness. The risks of walking or running barefoot excessively before you’re ready come from inadequate strength, and the only way to strengthen your feet is to use them! Sure, going out and sprinting a 5k for your first barefoot run will injure you. Instead, go for a short walk until your feet start to fatigue. Then call it a day. Or run around the block for 2 minutes. Give yourself enough rest to allow your feet to recover and rebuild before you try again. Over time, you’ll be able to walk further, run longer and start noticing remarkable changes in how your feet feel, look and function. When I gave up shoes in 2011 I couldn’t walk barefoot more than a few minutes before my feet hurt. I walked barefoot for a couple years to build up base strength, then began running barefoot – literally starting by running one block. I now regularly run 40-45 miles a week barefoot.

I seem to have written a novel, but this is an important and interesting topic for me! My last tidbit of advice is to not over-think it … just enjoy the improved sensory experience and awareness your feet give you and savor the growth, however gradual it may be. Happy barefooting!

What are your thoughts on the relative importance of foot structure and function, and how they influence one another?

I love hearing my readers’ experiences and questions, so please don’t hesitate to reach out!

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The shoulder-hip rotation equation

Stabiliity. Mobility. Activation. Relaxation. Each of these features has its place in a strong, efficient running stride. Yet, an excess or lack of one at the wrong place in the gait cycle can seriously throw off a runner’s biomechanics. Through some recent trials and experimentation of my own, I’ve learned how profoundly true this is for a proper kinematic balance throughout the core, extending from the pelvis up through the abs, back and shoulders.

Those who’ve been following my blog will be aware of my history of hamstring and foot injuries. I’ve struggled with disproportionate left hip/hamstring tension and tendinopathy for years, and have sustained beyond my fair share of right foot fractures and tendinoses. While these issues are more or less under control due to gradually improving biomechanics, more mindful training and frequent self-care (massage, ART and physical therapy), they continue to linger as minor annoyances on most runs. A couple weeks ago, my physical therapist performed a gait analysis to get to the source of these longstanding imbalances.

She noted three main issues:

1) Excessive left shoulder rotation. I tend to pull my left shoulder back too much right before left foot-strike. The arms should swing in the sagittal plane, but there should be minimal rotation at the shoulders.

Left shoulder rotates excessively

Left shoulder rotates excessively

2) Insufficient right leg drive. Compared to my left leg, my right leg does not come up as high during the swing phase. I can feel this while running, as if the leg is dragging behind me instead of driving back powerfully. In fact, I have a tendency to occasionally stub my right big toe due to my inability to lift.

Right leg lifts lower than left

Right leg lifts lower than left

3) Externally rotated right foot. When the foot strikes, it tends to land with the toes pointed outward. I am also keenly aware of this error, as it feels like the entire right leg is uncontrollably turned out.

Right foot rotates outward

Right foot rotates outward

Mental trick FAIL

For the past week, I’ve attempted to consciously correct each of these biomechanical errors in turn … without success. Efforts to stabilize my shoulders left me with excess tension from the neck down, through the shoulder and back. Empowering my right leg drive felt unnatural and exhausting, and turning my right foot inward was even more awkward and resulted in lateral ankle pain. Form correction FAIL.

My physical therapist prescribed some drills to ingrain proper shoulder and foot motor-memory; yet these changes will take time and I wanted a quick fix. I knew something major was off with my gait, so I launched my own investigation. I came across an article discussing the balance between shoulder and pelvic rotation (which I can no longer track down) that struck a chord. Excessive amounts of shoulder rotation, they explained, may signal insufficient hip rotation. If the hips are too rigid, the upper body compensates. Prior to my long run this week, I practiced this simple exercise to reinforce what proper pelvic rotation should feel like … and to no surprise, this was a novel sensation for my typically rigid running hips.

Mental trick SUCCESS!

Throughout my long run, I repeatedly checked in with my form, this time drawing on some new tools in my belt. Rather than forcefully immobilizing my upper body, I focused on relaxing the shoulders, keeping the neck extended, and leading with the chest. I increased my forward full-body lean and was cautious not to overstride. Most critically, I experimented – for the first time – with exaggerating my pelvic rotation. As my left leg began to swing back, I let the hip pull back with it … this was a remarkably new sensation, but felt fluid and right. I was suddenly able to attain much greater leg extension that usual, without force or effort. Further exploring the movement, I discovered that emphasizing rotation on the left compared to the right seemed to balance and better align my hips. The pattern of tension that typically evolves over my long runs – extending from my lower back down through the left glutes and hamstring – was oddly absent. Not only was my left leg moving with new-found fluidity, but my right leg had inadvertently gained strength and alignment as well. By increasing my left pelvic rotation, my right leg and foot were now freed to glide naturally through their stride. Without effort, the right foot was now striking straight and both legs were driving back with equal strength.

So how does a runner know how to balance stability with mobility? When during the gait cycle to relax and when to engage? It’s truly a delicate balance, and one that doesn’t always come naturally. Injuries that cause compensatory movement, or years of running with even slight dysfunction can further exacerbate and ingrain poor motor patterns. Critically, as each runner is unique in terms of structure and function, there is no one-size-fits-all biomechanical prescription. Even running experts agree there’s no “perfect” form, and it can be risky to change your form unnecessarily. My advice to you, runner, is to experiment with your gait if there’s a preexisting problem. Then, play with various adjustments and assess your body’s response until you hone in on changes that benefit you.

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