Tag Archives: barefoot running

Feet in shining armor: Paleo Barefoots review

CHAINMAIL. Quick … what comes to mind? Medieval warriors? Knights in shining armor? Running shoes? (Okay, maybe not so much shoes.) Given traditional recommendations for cushioned, supportive running shoes, the thought of metal chains against naked feet might not elicit a strong sense of comfort or safety.

THE CONCEPT

Indeed, even I – a barefoot runner – was skeptical when I first heard of the Paleo Barefoots, a minimalist footwear constructed entirely of chainmail. Being a sucker for functionally and aesthetically innovative advances in minimalist running, I became immediately intrigued. Like most minimalist shoes on the market, the Paleos are designed to allow the foot move as freely and naturally as possible, with just enough protection against the elements. But what sets the Paleos apart is their unique design that, theoretically, will let them last a lifetime. Even the most minimal shoes – including the more popular “toe” shoes or huaraches – require a rubber-like sole at least several millimeters thick to confer durability and protection. In contrast, the Paleos’ construction from metal – yes, literally minuscule steel links – eliminates the need for a thicker sole. This design yields a sock-like slipper, only 1.4 mm thick, with ultimate flexibility and ground feel.

My Paleos@Ultra with green paws

However, while chainmail will win the battle against dirt, sand, twigs and grass, the victor of a metal-versus-concrete war is anyone’s call. Thus, Paleos are intended only for use on ‘natural’ surfaces, and aren’t recommended for running through the concrete jungle. Such a product sounds like a dream come true for any barefoot runner looking to venture into more challenging terrain. But the unfortunate reality is, dreams aren’t fulfilled for free. In fact, the Paleos carry perhaps the heftiest price tag on the minimalist shoe market – on the order of two- to three-hundred U.S. dollars, depending on the style and options.

THE PRODUCT

After reading several glowing reviews, I became curious – okay, no … obsessed – with trying the Paleos. I rationalized the sacrifice to my bank account with the reassurance that it would be a one-time cost, as the Paleos should last forever if cared for. After much deliberation, I bit the bullet and purchased my very own Paleos@Ultra. Considering the high price tag and the shipping time from Germany, I was nervous about their fit and my chosen options. To my relief, their customer service promptly evaluated my foot tracing and confidently offered a size recommendation.

My Paleos fit perfectly right out of the box.

When they arrived, I was first struck by the quality of not only the shoe, but also the thoughtful packaging, informative care guide and personal touches. My Paleos arrived packaged carefully in an exquisite metal box, along with instructions and a complementary chainmail key chain. My personalized Paleos were equipped with engraved metal plates, black elastic laces, mesh lining socks and ankle wraps, and green “paws”, designed for extra grip on rough rocky or urban terrain. Right out of the box, this was clearly a quality product.

PERFORMANCE

In all honesty, it took me three attempts to fully appreciate the Paleo experience. As they’re unlike any other footwear I’ve tried, it took me some time to refine my fit and preferences. When I first put them on, they felt loose and heavy on my foot as I walked around my apartment. I couldn’t imagine them performing well while running. My first test run was a brief trot on a sandy trail cut short by skin irritation at the back of my ankle. Feeling that my Paleos were too loose, I had tightened the laces too snuggly, to the point where they dug into my achilles. Discouraged but not defeated, I tried another day, loosening the fit and wearing the sock liners. This first mini test-mile was a success and I was ready for a real trial run.

Paleos with sock liners

As I am far from an experienced trail runner, I sought out a gentle trail for my test run. The terrain was mostly packed sand, but also included several unavoidable rocky patches and stretches of rough gravel. I had only previously attempted this trail in full shoes or Luna sandals, and would never consider tackling it barefoot. In fact, convinced the Paleos would not hold up against the gravel and rocks, I stashed my Lunas as back-up. To my great surprise, the Paleos handled even the roughest segments with ease. The fine gravel and stones, which would typically abrade my bare feet, didn’t phase me. Although I could feel the larger rocks, not once did I get a foot bruise, which I’ve become notorious for sustaining. About two miles in, I did feel some irritation around my achilles (and later discovered a small blister as a result), which was easily remedied after a quick adjustment to loosen the laces. As the run progressed, the experience became almost surreal, as I soon forgot I was even wearing footwear, yet still felt well protected from the rough earth under foot. I found myself sprinting the end of my five-mile test run, carefree and thrilled with the Paleos’ exceptional performance.

THE SERVICE

This review wouldn’t be complete without mentioning the great folks behind the product. From start to finish, the owner himself made it a priority to respond to my questions and concerns via email and social media. They shipped my Paleos faster than promised, and they arrived in the U.S. remarkably quick. When they got stuck in customs, the owner looked into the issue and sent me shipping updates along with his apologies for the delay.

Sure, it may take some time for the mainstream running community and shoe market to embrace a metal sock as an acceptable option for running footwear. I don’t predict the PaleoBarefoots will soon be ranked among Runner’s World’s most popular shoes for comfort, style or affordability. But based on my initial impressions, I suspect there’s a niche of selective athletes who would be thrilled to discover this treasure. What barefoot runner isn’t looking for foot protection that not only embodies minimalism and functionality, but also the bonus perks of quality, creativity and beauty?

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Blisters, bruises and other bumps along the barefoot road

Your average runner has much to consider before heading out for a run. Do you try to stay cool and dry in your moisture-wicking tank, or bundle up in a hat and gloves? What socks are best for preventing blisters? Have your shoes surpassed their mileage limit? How much water and fuel should you tote during your long run?

Running barefoot eliminates many of these concerns, as the fit, cost and lifespan of socks and shoes become irrelevant. But barefoot running carries its own unique set of considerations that the typically shod runner may not anticipate. Since ditching my shoes I’ve encountered several new challenges, some of which are easily addressed, while others I have yet to conquer. Below I discuss the issues with which I’ve most frequently struggled, along with whatever solutions (if any!) that I’ve discovered.

Terrain

The beauty of going bare lies in the rainbow of sensory input from the earth to the feet. But sometimes these sensations can verge on intense, especially to the novice runner. With time, the trained barefooter should be able to run lightly enough that even the roughest gravel doesn’t phase them … or so I’ve heard. But for the rest of us who are still growing, challenging terrain can be the greatest limiting factor to enjoyable running. When I first began running barefoot, I restricted myself to the smoothest concrete and paved surfaces, still my favorite terrain. As I’ve become more adventurous, I’ve discovered the pleasures and benefits of diverse surfaces, and now incorporate as many different types as possible into my runs.

Smooth, flat, hard surfaces permit greater stability in the ankles and other joints, and can be an excellent way to reinforce proper form. However, miles of concrete can rapidly tire the feet. Veteran barefooters will attest that rough gravel is ideal for learning how to run lightly and softly. Even the slightest friction between foot and ground will tear up the feet, encouraging you to “place” and “lift” the foot, rather than skid, shuffle or push off. Even if you despise gravel running as much as myself, there is absolutely truth behind these claims, and it can be highly beneficial to incorporate brief rough stretches into your runs. Perhaps the most fun terrain, as any child will readily tell you, is grass or soft dirt. Besides just feeling magnificent on the soles, the natural variability of the surface is a great tool to strengthen the feet and ankles, and train the body to rapidly adapt to uncertain terrain. However, all that instability can also fatigue the legs if you’re not well adapted. And while that soft green grass may look inviting, it’s also a great hiding spot for twigs, stones and bugs! I’ve had one too many carefree grassy sprints abruptly disrupted by bruises, thorns and bee stings.

Blisters, abrasions and callouses

I lump these issues together as they often share both common causes and common fixes. The first discovery a new barefooter will likely make is the pain of blisters on the soles of the feet. Over my first couple weeks of running barefoot, my feet developed multiple small blisters on my toes and balls of my feet. As blisters are a direct result of friction, their location can inform about what you’re doing wrong, and help to easily correct your form. Blisters on your big toe? You might be gripping or pushing off aggressively during foot lift. As you self-correct, the blisters will quickly disappear. In fact, I can’t even recall my last blister. That said, I do still struggle with mild abrasions and callouses, both on the ball of my left foot, which too reflect improper form. Gait analysis confirmed that reduced mobility in this foot causes mild sheering at foot contact. Clearly, I still have work to do.

First Aid

photo credit @reasra

The best treatment for these form-related skin problems is, of course, to identify the problem and correct it! In fact, this is the only sustainable solution. That said, there are a few tricks to help you deal with – and dare I say, keep running through – these issues. Obviously, keep any open blisters or abrasions clean and protected. I’ve also found that applying vitamin E oil, or using finger and toe blister Bandaids, can expedite skin healing. For callouses, moisten the skin and then carefully file down the callous (don’t break the skin!) using a nail file. If you need to run with such an “injury”, a bandaid won’t last a quarter mile. However, covering the bandaid with a layer or two of strong athletic tape works wonders (I love leucotape). Be sure to to include the bandaid over the wound, to avoid irritation from direct contact with the tape adhesive. Using this application, the tape has remained intact for me over distances up to half marathons. I’ve had limited success with liquid bandages and super glue for short runs, but find that they wear off much faster than tape.

Bruises

Unless you run exclusively on treadmills or tracks, bruises – from rocks, acorns, uneven sidewalk, you name it – will be unavoidable. Usually, these are pretty benign. I often get them on my metatarsal heads or heel, and can easily run through them without pain. Gentle massage can help initially, and mild bruises typically clear up within 24 hours. However, in rare situations, a severe bruise can lead to more debilitating trauma. Just a few weeks ago, I trod on a rock at mile 2 of a 14-miler. I finished the run, only to notice the dull bruise after finishing (endorphins are both miraculous and dangerous!). I’ve been suffering intermittent burning, aching and numbness in that heel ever since, which I only just recently connected to that bone bruise sustained weeks ago. Oddly, I’ve been able to continue easy running, as it’s most aggravated by walking or downhill running. There’s not much one can do to treat a bone bruise, besides wait the natural course of healing, although I’ve found some mild relief from taping and cold/hot contrast water therapy to flush out the inflammation.

Cuts

“Don’t you cut yourself on broken glass?” asks everyone, all the time. I have yet to discover this planet laden with broken glass which shod runners apparently inhabit. However, if you’re running through a rough part town, a construction zone, or the Las Vegas strip (as I just recently attempted!), you just might encounter some glass. While this may be the greatest fear of many new barefooters, it actually poses much less risk than imagined. The skin rapidly adapts to barefooting by thickening, becoming remarkably resilient. I have indeed stepped on broken glass – probably way more often than I’m even aware – but have only been cut once. This, due to my own stupidity. I jumped full force into a deep puddle, only to discover a shattered bottle lurking within. The sole of my foot was covered in shards of glass, but only one managed a tiny puncture. I removed it, cleaned it, and was out running the next day. So runner, fear not the broken glass.

As I’m still admittedly a barefoot noob, there’s certainly much more I have yet to learn. So please, share your thoughts! What are your favorite ways of dealing with rough terrain, blisters, bruises and cuts? What other challenges have you encountered in your barefoot journey that I may soon discover?

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When barefoot novelty becomes a bare necessity

When I began running barefoot over a year ago, each barefoot run was a thrill. My feet experienced a world of exciting new sensations, I was running smoother and lighter than ever before, and running was simply fun! Over the ensuing several months, some of novelty, but none of the pleasure, wore off. My strength increased and I was able to run about half of my mileage barefoot. After following this system for some time, a distinct trend appeared. I deeply looked forward to those barefoot runs and approached them fearlessly, confident – no, certain – I would feel great. Coincidentally, a subtle dread for my shod runs began to grow. When I laced up my shoes, I could sometimes squeak out a good run, but just as often would slog through, tired, sloppy and achy. I hesitated to give up my shoes for fear of reducing my mileage, but began to resent those miserable junk miles. Finally, I became fed up with the frustration and – just over two months ago – took off my shoes for good. I had reached a turning point where I was no longer running barefoot just for fun, but because I found myself unable to run shod without significant discomfort. Bare feet had become a bare necessity.

The switch did not come without its sacrifices, however. Given that I was still adjusting to the unique demands of barefoot running, I had to cut my weekly mileage in half. This is no easy feat for a running junkie. Yet the patience required to start from scratch, in essence relearning to run, has proven beyond worth the challenge. I’ve learned more about proper biomechanics, my body’s strengths and weaknesses, and the delicate relationship between form and function, over the past ten weeks than over my entire 17 years of running.

Shod running forces one to perceive their form as if through a frosted window. In contrast, barefoot running allows you to perceive it in high resolution, as if through a microscope. Any structural imbalance or mechanical error is immediately apparent, as your feet afford the most exquisite and accurate sensory feedback. This feature builds the framework for a foolproof system to rapidly correct and optimize one’s running form. A few examples from my own training adaptations illustrate these benefits.

Overstriding > ankle pain

Slight overstriding on my right leg contributed to ankle pain. (Gait analysis courtesy Jennifer Reiner, DC)

Slight overstriding on my right leg contributed to ankle pain. (Gait analysis courtesy Jennifer Reiner, DC)

A major impetus for going bare was perpetual instability and strain in my ankles. I felt chronic fatigue in my posterior tibialis, Achilles and peroneal tendon, before and during the first few weeks of my switch. Playing with my form, I noted that the strain was alleviated when I landed with my feet under – not in front of – my center of mass. I had been … (gasp!) overstriding. It’s quite likely I’ve been doing so for many years, probably contributing to prior injuries, but it only became apparent barefoot. It’s not only visibly obvious, but also audibly detectable, as I hear a distinct slapping sound when my form gets sloppy and I return to my overstriding tendencies.

Heel-striking > shin stress

As my ankle issues resolved, the stress moved up my lateral shins and I acquired mild symptoms of anterior compartment syndrome. A bit of research suggested that shin pain can result from heel-striking, which can easily be resolved by adopting a forefoot strike. Within just a few days of consciously landing forward on the ball of my foot, my shin pain had cleared up. Intriguingly, though I was running barefoot and (mostly) avoiding overstriding, which are often associated with forefoot striking, I had still retained a subtle rearfoot strike.

Forefoot striking > forefoot ache

No gait change comes without some cost. With my forefoot shift, I experienced some moderate tightness and bruised sensations under the ball of the foot. Cautious not to overstress my feet with these new changes, I’ve been focusing on modifying my form according to my body’s current needs. If I feel excessive tension in my shins, I’ll emphasize a forefoot strike; when the forefoot acts up, I relax back into a rearfoot strike. When barefoot, these rapid shifts – and their immediate benefits – are easy and effective.

Foot immobility > abrasions

Immobility in my left big toe joint caused ankle rotation and shearing.

Immobility in my left big toe joint caused ankle rotation and shearing.

While I haven’t suffered a blister or cut in many, many months, my left ball of foot (under the base of the big toe) tends to get disproportionately tender compared to the left. With my increasing mileage, this had become increasingly problematic, and recently became coupled with a growing callous under the neighboring second metatarsal. This was a clear sign, that would otherwise have been masked by shoes, that there are still some lingering mechanical issues. My insightful physical therapist, who noted immobility in my big toe, prescribed some exercises to increase flexibility and mobility in the big toe joint. After only a few days, I’ve already noticed much less abrasive shearing. Yet again, another simple fix.

Personally, this recent barefoot journey has been immensely successful, enabling me to retrain myself to run well and consequently resolve chronic injuries, all the while restoring hope that most running problems can be overcome by simple training modifications. Yet despite the fact that I had to take off my shoes to discover this, I’m not convinced that it’s purely an issue of footwear. Rather, successful running fundamentally comes from proper form. Some can achieve this regardless of footwear. Others, such as myself, will need more help from tools that encourage mechanical corrections. For me, one of simplest, not to mention liberating, ways to do so has been to break down the barriers between body and environment and let my feet directly sense and respond to its rich surroundings.

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Why sweeping generalizations aren’t best for most runners

Barefoot is bad!Every movement has a counter-movement. Barefoot running is no exception, having recently been met with its share of backlash from skeptics and naysayers. While open discussion and objective critique are healthy responses to any fad, a recently published article – Why barefoot isn’t best for most runners – went a step too far with its distorted claims, never mind snarky attitude, to leave untouched.

Let’s walk through (shod or bare, I don’t care) some of the article’s most shining moments.

Seasoned members of staff can normally categorise runners at first glance … people looking for Vibrams are usually already wearing Vibrams, which is something of a giveaway. They also tend to look disgusted when you tell them that the shop doesn’t stock them, as though the sale of more traditional running shoes was some sort of conspiracy.

I’d like to start by commending the author for admitting that he and the other shoe store employees outright judge their customers based solely on appearance. I’ll be sure to avoid your store. On the other hand, they’ve sparked my curiosity with their mind-reading powers that enable them to detect paranoia over shoe conspiracy from just a facial expression. Of course, every shop should be free to stock only their chosen products. But if they decide to exclude an entire shoe category, they should be willing to accept that some customers will be disappointed by the limited options.

The problem is that we also didn’t evolve to run on roads. Or if we did, the evolutionary process that built the roads was the same one that designed the cushioned running shoe.

We can argue the evolution argument until we’re blue in the face, but for now there is no clear answer. Yes, it’s true neither modern shoes nor concrete existed until relatively recently. Sure, our bodies haven’t yet perfectly adapted to either. However, we also certainly haven’t evolved to remain sedentary 60% of our waking hours, rely on machines for transportation, stare at electronic screens or consume highly processed, packaged foods. But we’re an innovative and adaptable species and are surviving fine (for now) in the face of these rapid changes. The more immediate question, rather than how our ancestors ran, is what’s best for the modern runner. There’s no evidence (correct me if you can find some!) that 1) roads are worse for runners than dirt or grass, or 2) cushioned running shoes actually protect against the alleged “dangers” of modern running surfaces. Researchers have just begun to study the relationship between footwear and injuries, and the jury is still out. Thus far, there has been a lot of conflicting evidence, depending on the particular study methods and population, suggesting that the answer isn’t as simple as modeling our running after Grok.

When people were following the “Paleo diet” from necessity rather than whimsy, their life expectancy was probably in the 20s, if they were lucky.

How is the paleo diet relevant? The author appears to be critiquing barefoot running by debunking a completely independent lifestyle choice. I’m unaware of any correlation between footwear preference and dietary habits. In fact, I know several barefoot runners (@caitymccardell, @KenBobSaxton, myself) who are vegetarian or vegan, which one could argue is the antithesis of paleo.

For those who are planning to spend £100 or more on barefoot shoes to emulate Bannister, it should be noted that you can buy plimsolls for £4 on eBay.

Agreed. Spending $100+ on shoes is absurd. All the more reason to go barefoot. It’s free.

When I see people out running in barefoot shoes, they never look as if they’re having a particularly good time … Most people who use barefoot shoes admit to having to run less because of the pressure on their joints. For someone who enjoys running long distances and the feeling of having a bit of a spring in their step, the choice of barefoot shoes is therefore a bit baffling.

Sure, maybe those runners are miserable. Sure, maybe it’s because of their shoes, or maybe it’s because of the judgmental grimace on a certain gawker’s face. We’ll never know. But rather than speculate about another runner’s experience, why not just ask them? As one who actually runs barefoot and knows other barefoot runners, I can attest that my barefoot runs are often far more freeing and exhilarating than my shod runs. The spring in our step is precisely why we prefer to go bare. When running barefoot you literally feel that spring, conferred by the awakened, elastic arch and tendons of the foot. As for the relationship between barefoot running and joint pain (or lack thereof), look no further than some actual research.

A recent study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, however, supports what I’ve learned from talking to customers who have experimented with barefoot shoes … Half of them (study participants) began running in Vibram FiveFingers shoes gradually, following the guidelines set out on Vibram’s website, while the control group continued to run as normal. After 10 weeks, the control group had remained the same, but 10 out of the 19 runners who had transitioned to Vibram FiveFingers showed raised levels of bone marrow edema (a buildup of fluid similar to bruising) in their feet. The worry is that the barefoot running trend is a fairly recent one, and most of the study’s runners with raised levels of bone marrow edema wouldn’t actually have noticed an injury yet – many of the injuries caused by barefoot shoes may be lurking just around the corner.

This – the only piece of solid evidence presented – is once again misconstrued to support the “barefoot is bad” argument. Just a few of the flaws to this interpretation, which have been thoroughly detailed elsewhere, include:

1. The study used a transition protocol that was far more aggressive than experts recommend (Vibram has since changed their guidelines).

2. Many of the subjects didn’t even follow protocol, increasing their mileage more rapidly than advised.

3. Some edema can be part of a healthy response that leads to bone strengthening, indicating that the bone is appropriately adapting to a new stressor. The MRIs could not distinguish between normal edema and signs of injury.

Most running shops will now offer gait analysis, with the aim of selecting the type of shoes most suitable to the individual’s running style, body type and the surface they are planning to run on.

Note the term “aim”. Regardless of the intention, such recommendations are meaningless if their underlying assumptions are flawed (see herehere and here for why).

One final editorial note: By definition, barefoot running requires bare feet. Any individual’s beef with minimalist shoes bears little weight on the “goodness” or “badness” of barefoot running.

Rather than make a convincing argument for the author’s footwear preference, commentaries like this exemplify the absurdity of the growing barefoot versus shod derision. Get ready to defend yourselves, runners. Next up is the great headband versus hat debate!

A special shout-out to @akiraoc for bringing this article to my attention!

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